COLMCILLE 1500

1500 years ago, one of Ireland’s most famous sons was born in Gartan, Co. Donegal. With strong roots in the North West of Ireland, Colmcille (or St. Columba) went on to blaze a trail of cultural and social change around the world. He became one of Ireland’s three patron saints, the patron saint of Derry and his influence extends to this day.

Donegal County Council and Derry City & Strabane District Council have come together, with support from the North West Development Fund, to commemorate Colmcille’s remarkable life and legacy with a series of events and activities throughout the coming year.

Keep up to date with the interactive calendar to find out about the latest events happening in celebration of the saint during this special year. You can also follow us on Facebook and Instagram by clicking the icons at the top of the page or sign up to the newsletter.

In the meantime, get to know more about the man by scrolling through the timeline below for an enlightening account of his eventful life. You can also find links to resources related to Colmcille and the 1500th commemorations.

History of Colmcille

EARLY YEARS
Born into Irish royalty, Colmcille may always have been destined to do great things. The Cineál Chonaill clan of the Uí Néill dynasty welcomed him into their family on 7th December 520 or 521 AD in Gartan, Co. Donegal. His father was Feilimí, a highly respected Tír Chonaill chief, while his mother Eithne was a princess descended from aristocratic circles in Leinster. The legendary and fierce pagan king, Niall of the Nine Hostages, is said to be Colmcille’s great-great grandfather – he is arguably most famous for capturing a young slave in Wales and bringing him to Ireland, with that slave turning out to be none other than St. Patrick. Despite his illustrious family and having a legitimate claim, Colmcille had no intention of taking up the Uí Néill throne.
EDUCATION
The most affluent at that time traditionally gave their children to foster parents to be educated and Columba was no different. He was taken in by a priest called Cruithnechán, the same man who baptised him and who then provided the youngster’s first taste of religious education, although he had previously been training in the poetic arts as a bard. He found his calling, however, when it came to Christianity and was educated firstly in Kilmacrennan, and later under Finnian of Movilla and Finnian of Clonard. Coincidentally, he also studied alongside others who would go on to become saints - most notably Kenneth and Comgall - and in 551 he was finally ordained as a priest.
FOUNDING OF DERRY MONASTERY
Colmcille is said to have planted the first seeds along the River Foyle’s west bank which led to the eventual sprouting of the modern-day City of Derry. A community grew in the area after Colmcille built a monastery in 545 which attracted many settlers given the cultural significance of the religious institution. The location was originally called Doire Calgaigh which translates as ‘oakwood of Calgach’ but it later became known as Doire Cholmcille, meaning ‘oakwood of Colmcille’, a testament to the high regard Columba was held in. Derry and the North West continue to honour Colmcille to this day – in fact, he is so highly thought of that in recent times an enormous statue of the man was proposed to be built on the bed of the River Foyle, not unlike the iconic Christ the Redeemer in Rio de Janeiro.
TORY ISLAND & GLENCOLMCILLE
Following the founding of Derry’s monastery, Colmcille is estimated to have established between 55 and 66 Christian sites throughout Ireland. These include monasteries in Drumcliffe, Kells and Durrow, but there were also several in County Donegal such as Raphoe, Kilmacrennan and Drumhome. Of special significance however are Glencolmcille, where he is said to have resided for two years, and Tory Island, where upon landing he was met with the pagan king Oilill. Oilill allowed Colmcille to build his monastery on a piece of land the same size as his cloak, but the cloak miraculously spread over the entire island. Angered, the king set his dog on the visitor but Colmcille made the sign of the cross, and the dog leapt into the sea to its death but left its footprints on a rock, which has been immortalised as the ‘Rock of the Hound.’
THE BATTLE OF CÚIL DREIMHNE
Colmcille became embroiled in an infamous scandal when Finnian of Movilla returned from Rome with a text entitled “Vulgate” which Colmcille wanted to copy. Finnian, however, refused to give him permission, but he copied it anyway, leading to a dispute that went to court and to Diarmaid, High King of Ireland. Diarmaid ruled in Finnian’s favour, declaring the immortal words: “To every cow its calf, to every book its copy.” Colmcille did not take the verdict well, and his sense of injustice led to him enlisting the Uí Néill clan’s help, which culminated in the violent Battle of Cúil Dreimhne in Sligo in 561. Over 3,000 men died fighting as Colmcille claimed victory over Diarmaid, allowing him to keep his copy (The Cathach). The bloodshed caused outrage among the church’s hierarchy, and Colmcille was banished from Ireland.
SETTLING IN IONA
Upon his banishment, Colmcille set sail across the Irish Sea for Dál Riata in Scotland in 563 alongside 12 companions. He was a man who had friends in high places - probably helped by his royal lineage – so he reached out to his cousin, the Scottish Gaelic king Conall mac Comhaill , who gifted him the island of Iona shortly after their arrival. It was here that Colmcille built his most famous monastery which went on to become one of the most renowned cultural and religious powerhouses in Britain and Ireland and was the catalyst for converting much of pagan Scotland, northern England and even parts of Europe to Christianity. Iona’s significance remained long after Colmcille’s death with the island’s monks creating numerous manuscripts, including the exceptional Book of Kells which is around 1200 years old.
MYTHICAL ENCOUNTER WITH THE LOCH NESS MONSTER
It is said that Colmcille was the first to happen upon the fabled Loch Ness monster in 565, three years after moving to Scotland. While he was traversing the Highlands on his mission to spread Christ’s word, the beast is said to have risen from the loch’s depths and hurtled towards Lughaidh, one of Colmcille’s disciples. Upon seeing the monster, Colmcille is said to have performed a miracle, telling it to “go back with all speed” in the name of God. The infamous figure immediately descended back from whence it came, sparing the life of Lughaidh. This legendary account comes from the writings of Adhamhnán, who documented Colmcille’s life over a century after his death.
THE CONVENTION OF DROIM CEAT
Colmcille returned to his Irish homeland for the legendary Convention of Droim Ceat in 578. Limavady was the location for this royal gathering of nobility involving Áedán mac Gabráin, King of Dál Riata and the Irish Cineál Chonaill king Aodh mac Ainmhireach. Colmcille is said to have been the brains behind the occasion, devising a plot against their common enemy Baothán mac Cairill, the king of East Ulster. The convention’s main aim was probably to display ‘strength in numbers’ and all parties realised an alliance would be to their benefit. It is said that Colmcille attached sods of Scottish soil to his shoes as he didn’t want to stand on Irish turf, while he also launched a stark defence of the bards who were coming under fire for their ‘twisted words.’
DEATH & LEGACY
Following an eventful and dramatic life, Colmcille most likely died on the 9th of June, 597 aged in his mid-seventies. Despite being buried by his loyal followers on Iona, some of his relics now lie in Downpatrick, Co. Down alongside illustrious company – his fellow Irish patron saints St. Patrick and St. Brigid. Colmcille’s legacy endures to this day – 1,500 years later, St. Columb’s Park in Derry, Glencolmcille in Donegal and St. Columba’s Parish in Edinburgh are just some of the hundreds of places worldwide that bear his name in tribute to his achievements.
Previous
Next
EARLY YEARS
Born into Irish royalty, Colmcille may always have been destined to do great things. The Cenél Conaill clan of the Uí Néill dynasty welcomed him into their family on 7th December 520 or 521 AD in Gartan, Co. Donegal. His father was Feidhlimid, a highly respected Tír Chonaill chief, while his mother Eithne was a princess descended from aristocratic circles in Leinster. The legendary and fierce pagan king, Niall of the Nine Hostages, is said to be Colmcille’s great-great grandfather – he is arguably most famous for capturing a young slave in Wales and bringing him to Ireland, with that slave turning out to be none other than St. Patrick. Despite his illustrious family and having a legitimate claim, Colmcille had no intention of taking up the Uí Néill throne.
EDUCATION
The most affluent at that time traditionally gave their children to foster parents to be educated and Columba was no different. He was taken in by a priest called Cruithnechán, the same man who baptised him and who then provided the youngster’s first taste of religious education, although he had previously been training in the poetic arts as a bard. He found his calling, however, when it came to Christianity and was educated firstly in Kilmacrennan, and later under Finnian of Movilla and Finnian of Clonard. Coincidentally, he also studied alongside others who would go on to become saints - most notably Kenneth and Comgall - and in 551 he was finally ordained as a priest.
FOUNDING OF DERRY MONASTERY
Colmcille is said to have planted the first seeds along the River Foyle’s west bank which led to the eventual sprouting of the modern-day City of Derry. A community grew in the area after Colmcille built a monastery in 545 which attracted many settlers given the cultural significance of the religious institution. The location was originally called Daire Calgaich which translates as ‘oakwood of Calgaich’ but it later became known as Doire Colmcille, meaning ‘oakwood of Colmcille’, a testament to the high regard Columba was held in. Derry and the North West continue to honour Colmcille to this day – in fact, he is so highly thought of that in recent times an enormous statue of the man was proposed to be built on the bed of the River Foyle, not unlike the iconic Christ the Redeemer in Rio de Janeiro.
TORY ISLAND & GLENCOLMCILLE
Following the founding of Derry’s monastery, Colmcille is estimated to have established between 55 and 66 Christian sites throughout Ireland. These include monasteries in Drumcliffe, Kells and Durrow, but there were also several in County Donegal such as Raphoe, Kilmacrennan and Drumhome. Of special significance however are Glencolmcille, where he is said to have resided for two years, and Tory Island, where upon landing he was met with the pagan king Oilill. Oilill allowed Colmcille to build his monastery on a piece of land the same size as his cloak, but the cloak miraculously spread over the entire island. Angered, the king set his dog on the visitor but Colmcille made the sign of the cross, and the dog leapt into the sea to its death but left its footprints on a rock, which has been immortalised as the ‘Rock of the Hound.’
THE BATTLE OF CÚL DREIMHNE
Colmcille became embroiled in an infamous scandal when Finnian of Movilla returned from Rome with a text entitled “Vulgate” which Colmcille wanted to copy. Finnian, however, refused to give him permission, but he copied it anyway, leading to a dispute that went to court and to Diarmuid, High King of Ireland. Diarmuid ruled in Finnian’s favour, declaring the immortal words: “To every cow its calf, to every book its copy.” Colmcille did not take the verdict well, and his sense of injustice led to him enlisting the Uí Néill clan’s help, which culminated in the violent Battle of Cúl Dreimhne in Sligo in 561. Over 3,000 men died fighting as Colmcille claimed victory over Diarmuid, allowing him to keep his copy (The Cathach). The bloodshed caused outrage among the church’s hierarchy, and Colmcille was banished from Ireland.
SETTLING IN IONA
Upon his banishment, Colmcille set sail across the Irish Sea for Dál Riata in Scotland in 563 alongside 12 companions. He was a man who had friends in high places - probably helped by his royal lineage – so he reached out to his cousin, the Scottish Gaelic king Conall mac Comgall, who gifted him the island of Iona shortly after their arrival. It was here that Colmcille built his most famous monastery which went on to become one of the most renowned cultural and religious powerhouses in Britain and Ireland and was the catalyst for converting much of pagan Scotland, northern England and even parts of Europe to Christianity. Iona’s significance remained long after Colmcille’s death with the island’s monks creating numerous manuscripts, including the exceptional Book of Kells which is around 1200 years old.
MYTHICAL ENCOUNTER WITH THE LOCH NESS MONSTER
It is said that Colmcille was the first to happen upon the fabled Loch Ness monster in 565, three years after moving to Scotland. While he was traversing the Highlands on his mission to spread Christ’s word, the beast is said to have risen from the loch’s depths and hurtled towards Lugne, one of Colmcille’s disciples. Upon seeing the monster, Colmcille is said to have performed a miracle, telling it to “go back with all speed” in the name of God. The infamous figure immediately descended back from whence it came, sparing the life of Lugne. This legendary account comes from the writings of Adomnán, who documented Colmcille’s life over a century after his death.
THE CONVENTION OF DRUM CEAT
Colmcille returned to his Irish homeland for the legendary Convention of Drum Ceat in 578. Limavady was the location for this royal gathering of nobility involving Áedán mac Gabráin, King of Dál Riata and the Irish Cenél Conaill king Áed mac Ainmerech. Colmcille is said to have been the brains behind the occasion, devising a plot against their common enemy Báetán mac Cairill, the king of East Ulster. The convention’s main aim was probably to display ‘strength in numbers’ and all parties realised an alliance would be to their benefit. It is said that Colmcille attached sods of Scottish soil to his shoes as he didn’t want to stand on Irish turf, while he also launched a stark defence of the bards who were coming under fire for their ‘twisted words.’
DEATH & LEGACY
Following an eventful and dramatic life, Colmcille most likely died on the 9th of June, 597 aged in his mid-seventies. Despite being buried by his loyal followers on Iona, some of his relics now lie in Downpatrick, Co. Down alongside illustrious company – his fellow Irish patron saints St. Patrick and St. Brigid. Colmcille’s legacy endures to this day – 1,500 years later, St. Columb’s Park in Derry, Glencolmcille in Donegal and St. Columba’s Parish in Edinburgh are just some of the hundreds of places worldwide that bear his name in tribute to his achievements.
Previous
Next
EARLY YEARS
Born into Irish royalty, Colmcille may always have been destined to do great things. The Cenél Conaill clan of the Uí Néill dynasty welcomed him into their family on 7th December 520 or 521 AD in Gartan, Co. Donegal. His father was Feidhlimid, a highly respected Tír Chonaill chief, while his mother Eithne was a princess descended from aristocratic circles in Leinster. The legendary and fierce pagan king, Niall of the Nine Hostages, is said to be Colmcille’s great-great grandfather – he is arguably most famous for capturing a young slave in Wales and bringing him to Ireland, with that slave turning out to be none other than St. Patrick. Despite his illustrious family and having a legitimate claim, Colmcille had no intention of taking up the Uí Néill throne.
EDUCATION
The most affluent at that time traditionally gave their children to foster parents to be educated and Columba was no different. He was taken in by a priest called Cruithnechán, the same man who baptised him and who then provided the youngster’s first taste of religious education, although he had previously been training in the poetic arts as a bard. He found his calling, however, when it came to Christianity and was educated firstly in Kilmacrennan, and later under Finnian of Movilla and Finnian of Clonard. Coincidentally, he also studied alongside others who would go on to become saints - most notably Kenneth and Comgall - and in 551 he was finally ordained as a priest.
FOUNDING OF DERRY MONASTERY
Colmcille is said to have planted the first seeds along the River Foyle’s west bank which led to the eventual sprouting of the modern-day City of Derry. A community grew in the area after Colmcille built a monastery in 545 which attracted many settlers given the cultural significance of the religious institution. The location was originally called Daire Calgaich which translates as ‘oakwood of Calgaich’ but it later became known as Doire Colmcille, meaning ‘oakwood of Colmcille’, a testament to the high regard Columba was held in. Derry and the North West continue to honour Colmcille to this day – in fact, he is so highly thought of that in recent times an enormous statue of the man was proposed to be built on the bed of the River Foyle, not unlike the iconic Christ the Redeemer in Rio de Janeiro.
TORY ISLAND & GLENCOLMCILLE
Following the founding of Derry’s monastery, Colmcille is estimated to have established between 55 and 66 Christian sites throughout Ireland. These include monasteries in Drumcliffe, Kells and Durrow, but there were also several in County Donegal such as Raphoe, Kilmacrennan and Drumhome. Of special significance however are Glencolmcille, where he is said to have resided for two years, and Tory Island, where upon landing he was met with the pagan king Oilill. Oilill allowed Colmcille to build his monastery on a piece of land the same size as his cloak, but the cloak miraculously spread over the entire island. Angered, the king set his dog on the visitor but Colmcille made the sign of the cross, and the dog leapt into the sea to its death but left its footprints on a rock, which has been immortalised as the ‘Rock of the Hound.’
THE BATTLE OF CÚL DREIMHNE
Colmcille became embroiled in an infamous scandal when Finnian of Movilla returned from Rome with a text entitled “Vulgate” which Colmcille wanted to copy. Finnian, however, refused to give him permission, but he copied it anyway, leading to a dispute that went to court and to Diarmuid, High King of Ireland. Diarmuid ruled in Finnian’s favour, declaring the immortal words: “To every cow its calf, to every book its copy.” Colmcille did not take the verdict well, and his sense of injustice led to him enlisting the Uí Néill clan’s help, which culminated in the violent Battle of Cúl Dreimhne in Sligo in 561. Over 3,000 men died fighting as Colmcille claimed victory over Diarmuid, allowing him to keep his copy (The Cathach). The bloodshed caused outrage among the church’s hierarchy, and Colmcille was banished from Ireland.
SETTLING IN IONA
Upon his banishment, Colmcille set sail across the Irish Sea for Dál Riata in Scotland in 563 alongside 12 companions. He was a man who had friends in high places - probably helped by his royal lineage – so he reached out to his cousin, the Scottish Gaelic king Conall mac Comgall, who gifted him the island of Iona shortly after their arrival. It was here that Colmcille built his most famous monastery which went on to become one of the most renowned cultural and religious powerhouses in Britain and Ireland and was the catalyst for converting much of pagan Scotland, northern England and even parts of Europe to Christianity. Iona’s significance remained long after Colmcille’s death with the island’s monks creating numerous manuscripts, including the exceptional Book of Kells which is around 1200 years old.
MYTHICAL ENCOUNTER WITH THE LOCH NESS MONTSER
It is said that Colmcille was the first to happen upon the fabled Loch Ness monster in 565, three years after moving to Scotland. While he was traversing the Highlands on his mission to spread Christ’s word, the beast is said to have risen from the loch’s depths and hurtled towards Lugne, one of Colmcille’s disciples. Upon seeing the monster, Colmcille is said to have performed a miracle, telling it to “go back with all speed” in the name of God. The infamous figure immediately descended back from whence it came, sparing the life of Lugne. This legendary account comes from the writings of Adomnán, who documented Colmcille’s life over a century after his death.
THE CONVENTION OF DRUM CEAT
Colmcille returned to his Irish homeland for the legendary Convention of Drum Ceat in 578. Limavady was the location for this royal gathering of nobility involving Áedán mac Gabráin, King of Dál Riata and the Irish Cenél Conaill king Áed mac Ainmerech. Colmcille is said to have been the brains behind the occasion, devising a plot against their common enemy Báetán mac Cairill, the king of East Ulster. The convention’s main aim was probably to display ‘strength in numbers’ and all parties realised an alliance would be to their benefit. It is said that Colmcille attached sods of Scottish soil to his shoes as he didn’t want to stand on Irish turf, while he also launched a stark defence of the bards who were coming under fire for their ‘twisted words.’
DEATH & LEGACY
Following an eventful and dramatic life, Colmcille most likely died on the 9th of June, 597 aged in his mid-seventies. Despite being buried by his loyal followers on Iona, some of his relics now lie in Downpatrick, Co. Down alongside illustrious company – his fellow Irish patron saints St. Patrick and St. Brigid. Colmcille’s legacy endures to this day – 1,500 years later, St. Columb’s Park in Derry, Glencolmcille in Donegal and St. Columba’s Parish in Edinburgh are just some of the hundreds of places worldwide that bear his name in tribute to his achievements.
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HIGHLIGHT EVENTS

EXHIBITION OF AN CATHACH
ROYAL IRISH ACADEMY

EXHIBITION ‘COLMCILLE – MAN AND MYTH’ 
TOWER MUSEUM/DONEGAL COUNTY MUSEUM

SLÍ COLMCILLE – DÚCHAS AGUS OIDHREACHT (FILM)    LÍONRA LEITIR CEANAINN

BOOKS & BEYOND – VIRTUAL LECTURE SERIES
DONEGAL LIBRARY SERVICE

COLMCILLE 1500: A JOURNEY THROUGH IRELAND & SCOTLAND DONEGAL, DERRY, DURROW, KELLS, SLIGO, CAUSEWAY, ARGYLL, IONA, WESTERN ISLES

EXHIBITION ‘COLMCILLE – SACRED OBJECTS OF A SAINT’        NATIONAL MUSEUM OF IRELAND

Do you have a Colmcille 1500 related event?
Submit it to the councils for a possible feature on this website.

Colmcille 1500 online events or activities that have taken place or been released for the 1500th anniversary.

The Colmcille 1500 Commemorations will feature a number of social and cultural events marking the legacy of the saint over the course of 2021.  

 Due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic it will be necessary for many of these events to take place virtually. However, we are hopeful that we will be able to invite members of the public to attend certain events in person as and when we are given the go ahead from the authorities in all jurisdictions. 

 Any event taking place will comply fully with the relevant COVID-19 safety regulations and attendees will be asked to wear a mask when required, maintain social distancing and ensure frequent hand washing and/or sanitising. 

 If you have returned a positive test for COVID-19 or have been in close contact with a positive case within ten days of any event, attendance will be forbidden. Ticket refunds can be arranged in this situation. 

 These measures are necessary in order to ensure any events planned can proceed in the safest possible manner. 

FULL EVENTS CALENDAR



Links to other useful Colmcille information sources.

Stay up-to-date with the latest news on the Colmcille 1500 programme.

Find out about the projects awarded funding through the Colmcille 1500 Grant Scheme.

Stories and illustrations of Colmcille’s life and legacy.

GALLERY

Seachtain na Gaeilge 2022 | Déardaoin 14ú Márta ar 8pm | Ar líne
CONALLACH CRÁIFEACH CRÓGA - Físeán faoi shaol Cholm Cille
https://youtu.be/G7ddjKDZReg

Cuirtear i gcuimhne duit go bhfuil an gearrfhíseán seo á thaispeáint tráthnóna inniu mar chuid de Sheachtain na Gaeilge 2022. Tá sé ar cheann amháin de cheithre ghearrfhíseáin arna gcoimisiúnú ag Comhairle Contae Dhún na nGall mar chuid de Cholm Cille 1500, arna mhaoiniú ag Foras na Gaeilge agus Éire Chruthaitheach. Tá an físeán á mhaoiniú ag Foras na Gaeilge agus Éire Chruthaitheach, tá sé i nGaeilge le fotheidil Bhéarla. Neil McGrory as Macruarí Audio and Film a léirigh é le tacaíocht ó Róise Ní Laifeartaigh, Oifigeach Gaeilge, Comhairle Contae Dhún na nGall – a rinne an script agus an guthú don phíosa álainn seo a thugann ar thuras muid ar fud Dhún na nGall – chuig na háiteanna agus na scéalta a bhaineann leis an Naomh.

A reminder that this short video is being shown online this evening as part of Seachtain na Gaeilge 2022. It is one of four films commissioned by Donegal County Council as part of Colmcille 1500, funded by Foras na Gaeilge and Creative Ireland. It has been produced by Neil McGrory with support from Róise Ní Laifeartaigh, Irish Language Officer, Donegal County Council – who provided the script and voice for this beautiful piece which takes us on a journey throughout Donegal – to the places and stories associated with the Saint.
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BBC Two has released details of its new ‘Pilgrimage’ series which will feature seven celebrities following in the footsteps of Colmcille/Columba through Ireland, Northern Ireland and Scotland. Previous pilgrimage programmes have taken place in Spain, Italy and Turkey.

The latest series will be broadcast around Easter over three episodes with the first featuring Donegal and Derry. You may have spotted them filming here back in September!
https://www.bbc.com/mediacentre/2022/pilgrimage-bbc-two
#colmcille1500
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Éigse Uladh: 25-27 FEABHRA 2022
Comóradh ar shaol agus ar oidhreacht áitiúil Cholmcille

'Ar thóir m’Anama' will run on all three nights of the festival. This is an Irish language version of Brian Friel’s play 'The Enemy Within'.

Other events as part of Éigse Uladh include talks, tours (Gartan, North West Donegal and Tory), an exhibition of artwork from local schools and an ecumenical service.

http://crannog.ie/2022/02/07/eigse-uladh-2022/
#Colmcille1500
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St Brigid’s Day | Lá Fhéile Bríde | 1st February 2022

St. Brigid is one of Ireland's three patron saints, alongside St. Colmcille and St. Patrick – all three are said to be buried in Downpatrick. The origins of her Feast Day, on 1 February, are thought to originally be a pagan festival called Imbolc, which honoured Brigid as the goddess of poetry, healing and fire, and marked the beginning of spring. The day is also seen as a way to celebrate women, and the Celtic goddess’s heritage as a “symbol of feminine energy”. Lá Fhéile Bríde celebrates the arrival of longer, warmer days, and an emergence from the darkness of winter.

Internationally, the Department of Foreign Affairs is celebrating Lá Fhéile Bríde in locations such as Brussels, London, Malawi, Mexico, Ottawa, Stockholm and Vancouver. For more information go to https://www.gov.ie/en/press-release/3b5cb-department-of-foreign-affairs-marks-st-brigids-day-la-fheile-bride

Image: St Brigid’s Well, Kildare (Kildare Heritage)
#colmcille1500
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Celebrating Colmcille 1500 | Cross-Curricular Project 2021

Thank you to St Mary’s College in Derry for sharing videos from their outstanding cross curricular projects celebrating the life and legacy of St Columba. The pupils have produced some amazing examples of learning across the curriculum. Today is a video from YEAR 8.

#colmcille1500 @stmarysderry @DerryDiocesanCC

We would love to hear from any other schools who participated in Colmcille 1500 celebrations.
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