COLMCILLE 1500

1500 years ago, one of Ireland’s most famous sons was born in Gartan, Co. Donegal. With strong roots in the North West of Ireland, Colmcille (or St. Columba) went on to blaze a trail of cultural and social change around the world. He became one of Ireland’s three patron saints, the patron saint of Derry and his influence extends to this day.

Donegal County Council and Derry City & Strabane District Council have come together, with support from the North West Development Fund, to commemorate Colmcille’s remarkable life and legacy with a series of events and activities throughout the coming year.

Keep up to date with the interactive calendar to find out about the latest events happening in celebration of the saint during this special year. You can also follow us on Facebook and Instagram by clicking the icons at the top of the page or sign up to the newsletter.

In the meantime, get to know more about the man by scrolling through the timeline below for an enlightening account of his eventful life. You can also find links to resources related to Colmcille and the 1500th commemorations.

History of Colmcille

EARLY YEARS
Born into Irish royalty, Colmcille may always have been destined to do great things. The Cineál Chonaill clan of the Uí Néill dynasty welcomed him into their family on 7th December 520 or 521 AD in Gartan, Co. Donegal. His father was Feilimí, a highly respected Tír Chonaill chief, while his mother Eithne was a princess descended from aristocratic circles in Leinster. The legendary and fierce pagan king, Niall of the Nine Hostages, is said to be Colmcille’s great-great grandfather – he is arguably most famous for capturing a young slave in Wales and bringing him to Ireland, with that slave turning out to be none other than St. Patrick. Despite his illustrious family and having a legitimate claim, Colmcille had no intention of taking up the Uí Néill throne.
EDUCATION
The most affluent at that time traditionally gave their children to foster parents to be educated and Columba was no different. He was taken in by a priest called Cruithnechán, the same man who baptised him and who then provided the youngster’s first taste of religious education, although he had previously been training in the poetic arts as a bard. He found his calling, however, when it came to Christianity and was educated firstly in Kilmacrennan, and later under Finnian of Movilla and Finnian of Clonard. Coincidentally, he also studied alongside others who would go on to become saints - most notably Kenneth and Comgall - and in 551 he was finally ordained as a priest.
FOUNDING OF DERRY MONASTERY
Colmcille is said to have planted the first seeds along the River Foyle’s west bank which led to the eventual sprouting of the modern-day City of Derry. A community grew in the area after Colmcille built a monastery in 545 which attracted many settlers given the cultural significance of the religious institution. The location was originally called Doire Calgaigh which translates as ‘oakwood of Calgach’ but it later became known as Doire Cholmcille, meaning ‘oakwood of Colmcille’, a testament to the high regard Columba was held in. Derry and the North West continue to honour Colmcille to this day – in fact, he is so highly thought of that in recent times an enormous statue of the man was proposed to be built on the bed of the River Foyle, not unlike the iconic Christ the Redeemer in Rio de Janeiro.
TORY ISLAND & GLENCOLMCILLE
Following the founding of Derry’s monastery, Colmcille is estimated to have established between 55 and 66 Christian sites throughout Ireland. These include monasteries in Drumcliffe, Kells and Durrow, but there were also several in County Donegal such as Raphoe, Kilmacrennan and Drumhome. Of special significance however are Glencolmcille, where he is said to have resided for two years, and Tory Island, where upon landing he was met with the pagan king Oilill. Oilill allowed Colmcille to build his monastery on a piece of land the same size as his cloak, but the cloak miraculously spread over the entire island. Angered, the king set his dog on the visitor but Colmcille made the sign of the cross, and the dog leapt into the sea to its death but left its footprints on a rock, which has been immortalised as the ‘Rock of the Hound.’
THE BATTLE OF CÚIL DREIMHNE
Colmcille became embroiled in an infamous scandal when Finnian of Movilla returned from Rome with a text entitled “Vulgate” which Colmcille wanted to copy. Finnian, however, refused to give him permission, but he copied it anyway, leading to a dispute that went to court and to Diarmaid, High King of Ireland. Diarmaid ruled in Finnian’s favour, declaring the immortal words: “To every cow its calf, to every book its copy.” Colmcille did not take the verdict well, and his sense of injustice led to him enlisting the Uí Néill clan’s help, which culminated in the violent Battle of Cúil Dreimhne in Sligo in 561. Over 3,000 men died fighting as Colmcille claimed victory over Diarmaid, allowing him to keep his copy (The Cathach). The bloodshed caused outrage among the church’s hierarchy, and Colmcille was banished from Ireland.
SETTLING IN IONA
Upon his banishment, Colmcille set sail across the Irish Sea for Dál Riata in Scotland in 563 alongside 12 companions. He was a man who had friends in high places - probably helped by his royal lineage – so he reached out to his cousin, the Scottish Gaelic king Conall mac Comhaill , who gifted him the island of Iona shortly after their arrival. It was here that Colmcille built his most famous monastery which went on to become one of the most renowned cultural and religious powerhouses in Britain and Ireland and was the catalyst for converting much of pagan Scotland, northern England and even parts of Europe to Christianity. Iona’s significance remained long after Colmcille’s death with the island’s monks creating numerous manuscripts, including the exceptional Book of Kells which is around 1200 years old.
MYTHICAL ENCOUNTER WITH THE LOCH NESS MONSTER
It is said that Colmcille was the first to happen upon the fabled Loch Ness monster in 565, three years after moving to Scotland. While he was traversing the Highlands on his mission to spread Christ’s word, the beast is said to have risen from the loch’s depths and hurtled towards Lughaidh, one of Colmcille’s disciples. Upon seeing the monster, Colmcille is said to have performed a miracle, telling it to “go back with all speed” in the name of God. The infamous figure immediately descended back from whence it came, sparing the life of Lughaidh. This legendary account comes from the writings of Adhamhnán, who documented Colmcille’s life over a century after his death.
THE CONVENTION OF DROIM CEAT
Colmcille returned to his Irish homeland for the legendary Convention of Droim Ceat in 578. Limavady was the location for this royal gathering of nobility involving Áedán mac Gabráin, King of Dál Riata and the Irish Cineál Chonaill king Aodh mac Ainmhireach. Colmcille is said to have been the brains behind the occasion, devising a plot against their common enemy Baothán mac Cairill, the king of East Ulster. The convention’s main aim was probably to display ‘strength in numbers’ and all parties realised an alliance would be to their benefit. It is said that Colmcille attached sods of Scottish soil to his shoes as he didn’t want to stand on Irish turf, while he also launched a stark defence of the bards who were coming under fire for their ‘twisted words.’
DEATH & LEGACY
Following an eventful and dramatic life, Colmcille most likely died on the 9th of June, 597 aged in his mid-seventies. Despite being buried by his loyal followers on Iona, some of his relics now lie in Downpatrick, Co. Down alongside illustrious company – his fellow Irish patron saints St. Patrick and St. Brigid. Colmcille’s legacy endures to this day – 1,500 years later, St. Columb’s Park in Derry, Glencolmcille in Donegal and St. Columba’s Parish in Edinburgh are just some of the hundreds of places worldwide that bear his name in tribute to his achievements.
Previous
Next
EARLY YEARS
Born into Irish royalty, Colmcille may always have been destined to do great things. The Cenél Conaill clan of the Uí Néill dynasty welcomed him into their family on 7th December 520 or 521 AD in Gartan, Co. Donegal. His father was Feidhlimid, a highly respected Tír Chonaill chief, while his mother Eithne was a princess descended from aristocratic circles in Leinster. The legendary and fierce pagan king, Niall of the Nine Hostages, is said to be Colmcille’s great-great grandfather – he is arguably most famous for capturing a young slave in Wales and bringing him to Ireland, with that slave turning out to be none other than St. Patrick. Despite his illustrious family and having a legitimate claim, Colmcille had no intention of taking up the Uí Néill throne.
EDUCATION
The most affluent at that time traditionally gave their children to foster parents to be educated and Columba was no different. He was taken in by a priest called Cruithnechán, the same man who baptised him and who then provided the youngster’s first taste of religious education, although he had previously been training in the poetic arts as a bard. He found his calling, however, when it came to Christianity and was educated firstly in Kilmacrennan, and later under Finnian of Movilla and Finnian of Clonard. Coincidentally, he also studied alongside others who would go on to become saints - most notably Kenneth and Comgall - and in 551 he was finally ordained as a priest.
FOUNDING OF DERRY MONASTERY
Colmcille is said to have planted the first seeds along the River Foyle’s west bank which led to the eventual sprouting of the modern-day City of Derry. A community grew in the area after Colmcille built a monastery in 545 which attracted many settlers given the cultural significance of the religious institution. The location was originally called Daire Calgaich which translates as ‘oakwood of Calgaich’ but it later became known as Doire Colmcille, meaning ‘oakwood of Colmcille’, a testament to the high regard Columba was held in. Derry and the North West continue to honour Colmcille to this day – in fact, he is so highly thought of that in recent times an enormous statue of the man was proposed to be built on the bed of the River Foyle, not unlike the iconic Christ the Redeemer in Rio de Janeiro.
TORY ISLAND & GLENCOLMCILLE
Following the founding of Derry’s monastery, Colmcille is estimated to have established between 55 and 66 Christian sites throughout Ireland. These include monasteries in Drumcliffe, Kells and Durrow, but there were also several in County Donegal such as Raphoe, Kilmacrennan and Drumhome. Of special significance however are Glencolmcille, where he is said to have resided for two years, and Tory Island, where upon landing he was met with the pagan king Oilill. Oilill allowed Colmcille to build his monastery on a piece of land the same size as his cloak, but the cloak miraculously spread over the entire island. Angered, the king set his dog on the visitor but Colmcille made the sign of the cross, and the dog leapt into the sea to its death but left its footprints on a rock, which has been immortalised as the ‘Rock of the Hound.’
THE BATTLE OF CÚL DREIMHNE
Colmcille became embroiled in an infamous scandal when Finnian of Movilla returned from Rome with a text entitled “Vulgate” which Colmcille wanted to copy. Finnian, however, refused to give him permission, but he copied it anyway, leading to a dispute that went to court and to Diarmuid, High King of Ireland. Diarmuid ruled in Finnian’s favour, declaring the immortal words: “To every cow its calf, to every book its copy.” Colmcille did not take the verdict well, and his sense of injustice led to him enlisting the Uí Néill clan’s help, which culminated in the violent Battle of Cúl Dreimhne in Sligo in 561. Over 3,000 men died fighting as Colmcille claimed victory over Diarmuid, allowing him to keep his copy (The Cathach). The bloodshed caused outrage among the church’s hierarchy, and Colmcille was banished from Ireland.
SETTLING IN IONA
Upon his banishment, Colmcille set sail across the Irish Sea for Dál Riata in Scotland in 563 alongside 12 companions. He was a man who had friends in high places - probably helped by his royal lineage – so he reached out to his cousin, the Scottish Gaelic king Conall mac Comgall, who gifted him the island of Iona shortly after their arrival. It was here that Colmcille built his most famous monastery which went on to become one of the most renowned cultural and religious powerhouses in Britain and Ireland and was the catalyst for converting much of pagan Scotland, northern England and even parts of Europe to Christianity. Iona’s significance remained long after Colmcille’s death with the island’s monks creating numerous manuscripts, including the exceptional Book of Kells which is around 1200 years old.
MYTHICAL ENCOUNTER WITH THE LOCH NESS MONSTER
It is said that Colmcille was the first to happen upon the fabled Loch Ness monster in 565, three years after moving to Scotland. While he was traversing the Highlands on his mission to spread Christ’s word, the beast is said to have risen from the loch’s depths and hurtled towards Lugne, one of Colmcille’s disciples. Upon seeing the monster, Colmcille is said to have performed a miracle, telling it to “go back with all speed” in the name of God. The infamous figure immediately descended back from whence it came, sparing the life of Lugne. This legendary account comes from the writings of Adomnán, who documented Colmcille’s life over a century after his death.
THE CONVENTION OF DRUM CEAT
Colmcille returned to his Irish homeland for the legendary Convention of Drum Ceat in 578. Limavady was the location for this royal gathering of nobility involving Áedán mac Gabráin, King of Dál Riata and the Irish Cenél Conaill king Áed mac Ainmerech. Colmcille is said to have been the brains behind the occasion, devising a plot against their common enemy Báetán mac Cairill, the king of East Ulster. The convention’s main aim was probably to display ‘strength in numbers’ and all parties realised an alliance would be to their benefit. It is said that Colmcille attached sods of Scottish soil to his shoes as he didn’t want to stand on Irish turf, while he also launched a stark defence of the bards who were coming under fire for their ‘twisted words.’
DEATH & LEGACY
Following an eventful and dramatic life, Colmcille most likely died on the 9th of June, 597 aged in his mid-seventies. Despite being buried by his loyal followers on Iona, some of his relics now lie in Downpatrick, Co. Down alongside illustrious company – his fellow Irish patron saints St. Patrick and St. Brigid. Colmcille’s legacy endures to this day – 1,500 years later, St. Columb’s Park in Derry, Glencolmcille in Donegal and St. Columba’s Parish in Edinburgh are just some of the hundreds of places worldwide that bear his name in tribute to his achievements.
Previous
Next
EARLY YEARS
Born into Irish royalty, Colmcille may always have been destined to do great things. The Cenél Conaill clan of the Uí Néill dynasty welcomed him into their family on 7th December 520 or 521 AD in Gartan, Co. Donegal. His father was Feidhlimid, a highly respected Tír Chonaill chief, while his mother Eithne was a princess descended from aristocratic circles in Leinster. The legendary and fierce pagan king, Niall of the Nine Hostages, is said to be Colmcille’s great-great grandfather – he is arguably most famous for capturing a young slave in Wales and bringing him to Ireland, with that slave turning out to be none other than St. Patrick. Despite his illustrious family and having a legitimate claim, Colmcille had no intention of taking up the Uí Néill throne.
EDUCATION
The most affluent at that time traditionally gave their children to foster parents to be educated and Columba was no different. He was taken in by a priest called Cruithnechán, the same man who baptised him and who then provided the youngster’s first taste of religious education, although he had previously been training in the poetic arts as a bard. He found his calling, however, when it came to Christianity and was educated firstly in Kilmacrennan, and later under Finnian of Movilla and Finnian of Clonard. Coincidentally, he also studied alongside others who would go on to become saints - most notably Kenneth and Comgall - and in 551 he was finally ordained as a priest.
FOUNDING OF DERRY MONASTERY
Colmcille is said to have planted the first seeds along the River Foyle’s west bank which led to the eventual sprouting of the modern-day City of Derry. A community grew in the area after Colmcille built a monastery in 545 which attracted many settlers given the cultural significance of the religious institution. The location was originally called Daire Calgaich which translates as ‘oakwood of Calgaich’ but it later became known as Doire Colmcille, meaning ‘oakwood of Colmcille’, a testament to the high regard Columba was held in. Derry and the North West continue to honour Colmcille to this day – in fact, he is so highly thought of that in recent times an enormous statue of the man was proposed to be built on the bed of the River Foyle, not unlike the iconic Christ the Redeemer in Rio de Janeiro.
TORY ISLAND & GLENCOLMCILLE
Following the founding of Derry’s monastery, Colmcille is estimated to have established between 55 and 66 Christian sites throughout Ireland. These include monasteries in Drumcliffe, Kells and Durrow, but there were also several in County Donegal such as Raphoe, Kilmacrennan and Drumhome. Of special significance however are Glencolmcille, where he is said to have resided for two years, and Tory Island, where upon landing he was met with the pagan king Oilill. Oilill allowed Colmcille to build his monastery on a piece of land the same size as his cloak, but the cloak miraculously spread over the entire island. Angered, the king set his dog on the visitor but Colmcille made the sign of the cross, and the dog leapt into the sea to its death but left its footprints on a rock, which has been immortalised as the ‘Rock of the Hound.’
THE BATTLE OF CÚL DREIMHNE
Colmcille became embroiled in an infamous scandal when Finnian of Movilla returned from Rome with a text entitled “Vulgate” which Colmcille wanted to copy. Finnian, however, refused to give him permission, but he copied it anyway, leading to a dispute that went to court and to Diarmuid, High King of Ireland. Diarmuid ruled in Finnian’s favour, declaring the immortal words: “To every cow its calf, to every book its copy.” Colmcille did not take the verdict well, and his sense of injustice led to him enlisting the Uí Néill clan’s help, which culminated in the violent Battle of Cúl Dreimhne in Sligo in 561. Over 3,000 men died fighting as Colmcille claimed victory over Diarmuid, allowing him to keep his copy (The Cathach). The bloodshed caused outrage among the church’s hierarchy, and Colmcille was banished from Ireland.
SETTLING IN IONA
Upon his banishment, Colmcille set sail across the Irish Sea for Dál Riata in Scotland in 563 alongside 12 companions. He was a man who had friends in high places - probably helped by his royal lineage – so he reached out to his cousin, the Scottish Gaelic king Conall mac Comgall, who gifted him the island of Iona shortly after their arrival. It was here that Colmcille built his most famous monastery which went on to become one of the most renowned cultural and religious powerhouses in Britain and Ireland and was the catalyst for converting much of pagan Scotland, northern England and even parts of Europe to Christianity. Iona’s significance remained long after Colmcille’s death with the island’s monks creating numerous manuscripts, including the exceptional Book of Kells which is around 1200 years old.
MYTHICAL ENCOUNTER WITH THE LOCH NESS MONTSER
It is said that Colmcille was the first to happen upon the fabled Loch Ness monster in 565, three years after moving to Scotland. While he was traversing the Highlands on his mission to spread Christ’s word, the beast is said to have risen from the loch’s depths and hurtled towards Lugne, one of Colmcille’s disciples. Upon seeing the monster, Colmcille is said to have performed a miracle, telling it to “go back with all speed” in the name of God. The infamous figure immediately descended back from whence it came, sparing the life of Lugne. This legendary account comes from the writings of Adomnán, who documented Colmcille’s life over a century after his death.
THE CONVENTION OF DRUM CEAT
Colmcille returned to his Irish homeland for the legendary Convention of Drum Ceat in 578. Limavady was the location for this royal gathering of nobility involving Áedán mac Gabráin, King of Dál Riata and the Irish Cenél Conaill king Áed mac Ainmerech. Colmcille is said to have been the brains behind the occasion, devising a plot against their common enemy Báetán mac Cairill, the king of East Ulster. The convention’s main aim was probably to display ‘strength in numbers’ and all parties realised an alliance would be to their benefit. It is said that Colmcille attached sods of Scottish soil to his shoes as he didn’t want to stand on Irish turf, while he also launched a stark defence of the bards who were coming under fire for their ‘twisted words.’
DEATH & LEGACY
Following an eventful and dramatic life, Colmcille most likely died on the 9th of June, 597 aged in his mid-seventies. Despite being buried by his loyal followers on Iona, some of his relics now lie in Downpatrick, Co. Down alongside illustrious company – his fellow Irish patron saints St. Patrick and St. Brigid. Colmcille’s legacy endures to this day – 1,500 years later, St. Columb’s Park in Derry, Glencolmcille in Donegal and St. Columba’s Parish in Edinburgh are just some of the hundreds of places worldwide that bear his name in tribute to his achievements.
Previous
Next
Do you have a Colmcille 1500 related event?
Submit it to the councils for a possible feature on this website.

The Colmcille 1500 Commemorations will feature a number of social and cultural events marking the legacy of the saint over the course of 2021.  

 Due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic it will be necessary for many of these events to take place virtually. However, we are hopeful that we will be able to invite members of the public to attend certain events in person as and when we are given the go ahead from the authorities in all jurisdictions. 

 Any event taking place will comply fully with the relevant COVID-19 safety regulations and attendees will be asked to wear a mask when required, maintain social distancing and ensure frequent hand washing and/or sanitising. 

 If you have returned a positive test for COVID-19 or have been in close contact with a positive case within ten days of any event, attendance will be forbidden. Ticket refunds can be arranged in this situation. 

 These measures are necessary in order to ensure any events planned can proceed in the safest possible manner. 

FULL EVENTS CALENDAR



Links to other useful Colmcille information sources.

Stories and illustrations of Colmcille’s life and legacy.

GALLERY

Roughly 1.5 km north of Cnoc an tSuidhe is the site known in the Middle Ages as Cédimthect Choluim Cille, [‘First Walk of Colum Cille’]. Ó Domhnaill said it was ‘the place where Colmcille took his first steps and his first walk as a child’ and that ‘it is contrary to nature that anyone who goes on pilgrimage to that place brings away disease or sickness of any kind with them’.

Source: Donegal Annual 2021

#colmcille1500 #colmcille #stcolumba #familytree #saint #donegal #derry
...

St. Colmcille’s relations Cenél Conailll’s kingdom originated in agricultural land of east Donegal. Their headquarters was at what is now called Croghan Hill, a Ridge above the River Finn stretching between Lifford and Castlefin.

Before St. Colmcille’s death the kingdom expanded to double its original extent, stretching from Derry to Donegal town. Relatives of the saint, Sétna and Àed mac Ainmirech were powerful and ambitious kings during this time.

Source: Donegal Annual 2021

#colmcille1500 #colmcille #stcolumba #familytree #saint #donegal #derry
...

"#Colmcille1500 | @HistoricEnvScotland | St Columba’s Scotland

Historic Environment Scotland is marking the 1500th anniversary year through a poetry project to celebrate Columba as the ‘Patron Saint of Poetry ‘- mapping his time in Scotland, the nine places that he touched, alongside the poetry they have inspired.
Today we bring you one of these locations and the poem inspired by the Poet in Residence. You can see all of the sites at: https://storymaps.arcgis.com/stories/ae1235fda91c489e83a414a0d580d4fb and download a beautiful collection of the poems at https://www.historicenvironment.scot/media/7508/st-columba-poetry.pdf

SITE 9: Dunkeld Cathedral
With frequent Viking raids along the western Islands, in 849 the relics of St Columba were removed from Iona for protection. They were brought to Dunkeld by King Kenneth MacAlpin, who appointed a bishop at Dunkeld, and Columba became the patron saint of Dunkeld and its monastery. Removed to Ireland after the Reformation, some believe there are still relics of Columba hidden within the Cathedral grounds.
"
...

"#Colmcille1500 | @HistoricEnvScotland | St Columba’s Scotland

Historic Environment Scotland is marking the 1500th anniversary year through a poetry project to celebrate Columba as the ‘Patron Saint of Poetry ‘- mapping his time in Scotland, the nine places that he touched, alongside the poetry they have inspired.
Today we bring you one of these locations and the poem inspired by the Poet in Residence. You can see all of the sites at: https://storymaps.arcgis.com/stories/ae1235fda91c489e83a414a0d580d4fb and download a beautiful collection of the poems at https://www.historicenvironment.scot/media/7508/st-columba-poetry.pdf

SITE 8: Eileach an Naoimh
Although the monastic remains here have been attributed to the monastery founded by St Brendan of Clontarf, there is a tradition that Columba also founded a monastery here and that his mother, Eithne, is buried here. It was place of pilgrimage until the Reformation and now, uninhabited and not served by public transport, presents a glimpse into the solitude of monastic life.
"
...

"#Colmcille1500 | @HistoricEnvScotland | St Columba’s Scotland

Historic Environment Scotland is marking the 1500th anniversary year through a poetry project to celebrate Columba as the ‘Patron Saint of Poetry ‘- mapping his time in Scotland, the nine places that he touched, alongside the poetry they have inspired.
Today we bring you one of these locations and the poem inspired by the Poet in Residence. You can see all of the sites at: https://storymaps.arcgis.com/stories/ae1235fda91c489e83a414a0d580d4fb and download a beautiful collection of the poems at https://www.historicenvironment.scot/media/7508/st-columba-poetry.pdf

SITE 7: Chapel Finian
Built in the 10th-11th centuries Chapel Finian was named after Columba’s tutor, the Irish Saint and scholar Finnian. The scholarly legacy of both Columba and Finnian created some of the most remarkable works of religious art in Ireland and Scotland as well as a huge volume of the biblical commentaries found across Scotland from the period. But despite this shared legacy, tradition has it that Columba fled Ireland after a dispute with Finnian about the copying of a religious text.
"
...

"#Colmcille1500 | @HistoricEnvScotland | St Columba’s Scotland

Historic Environment Scotland is marking the 1500th anniversary year through a poetry project to celebrate Columba as the ‘Patron Saint of Poetry ‘- mapping his time in Scotland, the nine places that he touched, alongside the poetry they have inspired.
Today we bring you one of these locations and the poem inspired by the Poet in Residence. You can see all of the sites at: https://storymaps.arcgis.com/stories/ae1235fda91c489e83a414a0d580d4fb and download a beautiful collection of the poems at https://www.historicenvironment.scot/media/7508/st-columba-poetry.pdf

SITE 6: Loch Ness
Columba’s travels in Scotland took him at least as far north as Loch Ness, where tradition has it he scared off a monster that had been terrorising locals. As with his interactions with kings from Dál Riata and Briton, Columba was both on a diplomatic mission, to help create a safe environment for his monks to travel in, and a missionary one. The stories around his travels focus on miracles but the mere act of travelling across Scotland at that time would have been far from easy.
"
...

"#Colmcille1500 | @HistoricEnvScotland | St Columba’s Scotland

Historic Environment Scotland is marking the 1500th anniversary year through a poetry project to celebrate Columba as the ‘Patron Saint of Poetry ‘- mapping his time in Scotland, the nine places that he touched, alongside the poetry they have inspired.
Today we bring you one of these locations and the poem inspired by the Poet in Residence. You can see all of the sites at: https://storymaps.arcgis.com/stories/ae1235fda91c489e83a414a0d580d4fb and download a beautiful collection of the poems at https://www.historicenvironment.scot/media/7508/st-columba-poetry.pdf

SITE 5: Keills Chapel
Although the chapel itself is from the 1100s, the carved stones date to as far back as the 700s. The carving style of the stones typifies that found in Iona and the Keills Cross is the only example of that style of decoration found on the mainland. It has been suggested that the cross was transported to Keills Chapel after construction, demonstrating how Columba's legacy touched not just the spread of Christianity, but of the Insular artistic style that accompanied it.
"
...

"#Colmcille1500 | @HistoricEnvScotland | St Columba’s Scotland

Historic Environment Scotland is marking the 1500th anniversary year through a poetry project to celebrate Columba as the ‘Patron Saint of Poetry ‘- mapping his time in Scotland, the nine places that he touched, alongside the poetry they have inspired.
Today we bring you one of these locations and the poem inspired by the Poet in Residence. You can see all of the sites at: https://storymaps.arcgis.com/stories/ae1235fda91c489e83a414a0d580d4fb and download a beautiful collection of the poems at https://www.historicenvironment.scot/media/7508/st-columba-poetry.pdf

SITE 4: Dumbarton Castle
The history of Dumbarton Castle goes back over 1,500 years to when it was known as Alt Clut (Rock of the Clyde). There is a suggestion that Columba may have acted as an emissary between the Britons and Dál Riata, and it was certainly a significant power during his time in Scotland. "
...

"#Colmcille1500 | @HistoricEnvScotland | St Columba’s Scotland

Historic Environment Scotland is marking the 1500th anniversary year through a poetry project to celebrate Columba as the ‘Patron Saint of Poetry ‘- mapping his time in Scotland, the nine places that he touched, alongside the poetry they have inspired.
Today we bring you one of these locations and the poem inspired by the Poet in Residence. You can see all of the sites at: https://storymaps.arcgis.com/stories/ae1235fda91c489e83a414a0d580d4fb and download a beautiful collection of the poems at https://www.historicenvironment.scot/media/7508/st-columba-poetry.pdf

SITE 3: Iona Abbey
Columba is most closely associated with the Island of Iona, where he set up a monastery that created numerous churches and religious settlements across mainland Scotland, playing a key role in the spread of Christianity here. The monastery survived until the 12th century and although the reformation ended monastic life, the island is still considered one of Scotland’s most sacred sites. As well as a religious site, Iona is the site of great artistic beauty, from the creation of the Book of Kells (now in Dublin) to medieval carved stones that characterise early Scottish Christianity. "
...

#Colmcille1500 | @HistoricEnvScotland | St Columba’s Scotland

Historic Environment Scotland is marking the 1500th anniversary year through a poetry project to celebrate Columba as the ‘Patron Saint of Poetry ‘- mapping his time in Scotland, the nine places that he touched, alongside the poetry they have inspired.
Today we bring you one of these locations and the poem inspired by the Poet in Residence. You can see all of the sites at: https://storymaps.arcgis.com/stories/ae1235fda91c489e83a414a0d580d4fb and download a beautiful collection of the poems at https://www.historicenvironment.scot/media/7508/st-columba-poetry.pdf

SITE 2: Dunadd Fort
Dunadd was the power centre of Dál Riata, the Gaelic kingdom that covered what is now Argyll and part of Country Antrim, in 6th-8th centuries. As well as meeting with Gaelic king Conall, Columba is said to have visited here for the inauguration of his successor, Áedán mac Gabráin, performing the first Christian anointment of a British king.
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#Colmcille1500 | @HistoricEnvScotland | St Columba’s Scotland

Historic Environment Scotland is marking the 1500th anniversary year through a poetry project to celebrate Columba as the ‘Patron Saint of Poetry ‘- mapping his time in Scotland, nine places that he touched, alongside the poetry they have inspired.

Today we bring you one of these locations and the poem inspired by the Poet in Residence. You can see all of the sites at: https://storymaps.arcgis.com/stories/ae1235fda91c489e83a414a0d580d4fb and download a beautiful collection of the poems at https://www.historicenvironment.scot/media/7508/st-columba-poetry.pdf

SITE 1: St Columba's Cave
Tradition has it that Columba waited here for a few days when travelling north from Ireland in order to meet with the local king Conall mac Comgaill, based in Dunadd. It was most likely Conall who gave Columba permission to set up his monastery on Iona. Given Columba’s high status and that the area was part of Dál Riata, it is unlikely that Columba sheltered in a cave, but the cave has been a site of Christian pilgrimage and reflection for hundreds of years.
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#HeritageWeek #colmcille1500 | Events today as part of Heritage Week

Donegal Library Service's brings us the final lecture today as part of the ‘Colmcille Books & Beyond’ series to celebrate the saint’s life and his close association with books and the literary world.

https://youtu.be/9cJU4po4X-s
Saturday 21st August at 8.00pm: Joe Brennan “Colmcille the Legend”
Renowned author and storyteller Joe Brennan will bring to life, through storytelling, the folklore and legends that have grown around the figure of Colmcille.

To view the earlier lectures in the series go to https://www.youtube.com/user/wwwdonegalcocoie/videos #DonegalCountyLibrary
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#Colmcille1500 | Did you know that 15th August was one of the traditional days to visit a St Colmcille Holy Well or part of a traditional ‘Turas’ (journey or pilgrimage) period running from the saint’s Feast Day on 9th June.

In Gleann Cholm Cille (Glencolmcille), the ‘Turas Cholm Cille’ is performed between 9th June and 15th August each year and is 4.8km long, taking about three hours to complete. Pilgrims visit 15 stations and perform specific prayers and rituals at each.
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#Archeology | Fr. James MacDyer Archaeology School | Sat 31st Jul - Sat 7th Aug | http://oideasgael.ie/en/archaeology/

Gleann Cholm Cille (The Valley of St Columba) and the nearby valleys in southwest Donegal contain some of the most interesting prehistoric and early historic structures in Ireland (some would argue, in Europe). This Summer School, based in such an appropriate location, is aimed at adults with an interest in the archaeology and ancient history of Ireland.

Although there is no absolute certainty, it is understood from recent research that Colm Cille, the patron saint of Gleann Cholm Cille, was born on 7 December 520. Colm Cille was a hugely important figure in many aspects of the early culture of Ireland, Scotland and, to a lesser extent, the north of England. To mark the anniversary year, the 2021 Archaeology Summer School will focus mainly on the early Christian period and the history, lore and literature of the saint. The 2021 Summer School will be directed by Dr Brian Lacey who has been researching the archaeology and early history of Counties Donegal and Derry for over 40 years and is one of the foremost Columban scholars in Ireland.

More Info: http://oideasgael.ie/en/archaeology/
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Earagail Arts Festival | 𝗕𝗶𝗻 𝗕𝗼𝗮𝘁 - 𝗥𝗲𝘀𝘂𝗿𝗿𝗲𝗰𝘁𝗶𝗼𝗻 | Glebe House & Gallery | Sat 24th - Sun 25th July | 11am - 6.30pm | https://eaf.ie/events/bin-boat/

Bloomer and Keogh resurrect their 2005 Venice Biennale masterpiece ‘Bin Boat’ for an installation on Gartan lake in homage to Colmcille. Is this the bin boat’s last outing before it becomes a hen house?

Nicholas Keogh (b. 1977) has represented Northern Ireland at the Venice Biennale in 2005 and the Republic of Ireland at Experience Pommery #5 L’art en Europe in 2008.

Paddy Bloomer is an artist, inventor, explorer and plumber based in Belfast. Bloomer studied fine and applied art at University of Ulster, Belfast, 2000 and 2015, and has exhibited extensively in Ireland and abroad.

These two close friends have embarked on many adventures together and trusted each other with their lives on many occasions, since their first art collaboration in 2001 – a life sized mechanical Walking Cow. In 2004 they were asked by curator Hugh Mulholland to take part in Northern Ireland’s first participation in the Venice Biennale. The two friends then built the two berth, inboard engine, steel hulled, bin disco boat in six months, one of them working days, the other working nights and went on a seven week adventure of the busy and turbulent Venice water ways. The boat was then on the Irish water ways for seven years.

For years now it has been lying derelict and unloved and this installation on Gartan lake, in homage to Colmcille, is the bin boat’s last outing before it becomes a hen house. In the future they intend to publish the Captain’s log which documents the ups and downs of the trip, a case of cabin fever and a bout of wind madness.

https://eaf.ie/events/bin-boat/
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𝗗𝗼𝗶𝗿𝗲 𝗖𝗼𝗹𝗺𝗰𝗶𝗹𝗹𝗲 | Colmcille is said to have planted the first seeds along the River Foyle’s west bank which led to the eventual sprouting of the modern-day City of Derry.
Originally called Daire Calgaich which translates as ‘oakwood of Calgaich’ it later became known as Doire Colmcille, meaning ‘oakwood of Colmcille’, a testament to the high regard Columba was held in. Derry and the North West continue to honour Colmcille to this day.

📲Visit colmcille1500.com for more on this series.

#colmcille #colmcille1500 #colmcille1500NW #derry
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#language | Scoil Samhraidh Teanga agus Cultúir Oideas Gael | Language & Cultural Summer School | 24th - 31st July | https://bit.ly/3hWsAjV
Díríonn príomhchúrsa aitheanta Oideas Gael ar Naomh Colm Cille i mbliana agus ar an oidhreacht shaibhir litríochta, ealaíne agus ceoil a bhaineann leis. Cuirfear clár speisialta ceardlann agus imeachtaí i láthair le linn na seachtaine seo ar a n-áirítear ceolchoirmeacha, léachtaí, pléphainéil agus gníomhaíochtaí eile.

This year, Oideas Gael’s flagship course focuses on Colm Cille and his heritage in literature, art and music. This unique week features a specially-tailored programme of classes and events including performances, lectures, panel discussions and other activities.

Further Info: https://bit.ly/3hWsAjV
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Did you know❓
𝗔𝗻 𝗖𝗮𝘁𝗵𝗮𝗰𝗵, the manuscript containing the psalter of St Colmcille was used as a talisman in medieval Ireland to bring good luck to its owners.
The tradition associated with the relic of St Colmcille involved carrying it three times right-hand-wise around the army to bring success in battle.

An Cathach, meaning “the Battler”, is the oldest surviving manuscript in Ireland, and the second oldest Latin psalter in the world.

𝗟𝗲𝗮𝗿𝗻 𝗺𝗼𝗿𝗲: https://bit.ly/340rZXI
#Colmcille #Colmcille1500 #AnCathach #TheBattler #IrishHistory #History
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The coast of Gleann Cholm Cille, Co. Donegal at sunset. 🌊

@govisitdonegal

#donegal #colmcille #colmcille1500 #Irishcoast #ireland
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#poetryworkshop | 𝗖𝗲𝗹𝗲𝗯𝗿𝗮𝘁𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝗖𝗼𝗹𝘂𝗺𝗯𝗮: 𝗦𝘁. 𝗖𝗼𝗹𝘂𝗺𝗯𝗮, 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗟𝗲𝗴𝗲𝗻𝗱 | Thurs 15th July | 6.30pm - 8pm | https://bit.ly/3yh9a0x
Between his religious work, his political influence, and his intellectual endeavours, it's no surprise that tales and traditions concerning Columba's life are still abound in Scotland today.

But how much of the legend of St. Columba is really true - and how much does that truth matter? Historic Environment Scotland Poet in residence Alex Aldred invites you to find out.
𝗥𝗲𝗴𝗶𝘀𝘁𝗲𝗿 𝗡𝗼𝘄: https://bit.ly/3yh9a0x
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